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  • "Breaking Wave" Supercell

  • Among the most spectacular supercells I've ever seen, this dazzling storm cruised eastward across the nocturnal Nebraska sky, bathing itself in almost continuous light from its own furious generation engine for intracloud lightning.  The storm itself took on the shape of an enormous breaking wave, while shear-induced, parall[...]
  • Cranebow

  • Here is but a small glimpse of that sublime moment when, after three days of cold, windy overcast, the line of showers passes east, sunshine breaks out to illuminate the late-afternoon "magic hour", the "American Serengeti" brilliantly erupts with life:   hundreds upon hundreds of sandhill cranes take off into a rainbow-fest[...]
  • Slapout Late

  • Viewing the "Slapout tornado's" surroundings at wide angle reveals an arcus cloud on the right side (NNW of the tornado), which actually was the rear-flank gust front for a large, newer, rain-wrapped mesocyclone forming unseen to our W (off the screen to the right).  The whole scene looks rather "gust-fronty". Indeed, if we [...]
  • Lake Perryton

  • No, this isn't one of those classical arcus-cloud scenes from somewhere around the Rio de la Plata in South America. Instead, it's the high, normally dry Texas Panhandle!  As if a previous day of excessive rains in an already-wet spring weren't enough, yet another thunderstorm loomed with its shelf cloud, ready to drench thi[...]
  • Snow Geese in the Rain

  • During the "magic hour" of late-afternoon light, a small flock of snow geese and countless raindrops, near and far, imparted an oil-painting-like texture to the wondrous scene along the back side of a band of rain.  These and another half million of their closest friends and relatives (geese and cranes) converge annually upo[...]
  • Blizzard at My Back

  • Yes, I was out in a full-fledged blizzard with gusts to 60 mph, barely able to stand, bracing with back into wind, shooting away.  It wasn't balmy outside.  Fortunately, I was dressed in more layers than a Vidalia onion, looking much like the Michelin Man, and didn't have to go too far to get into warm shelter. Freezing in r[...]
  • Congestus at Sunset

  • About an hour and a half before this scene, a heavy-precipitation (HP) supercell passed over the semiarid southwest Texas scrubland below, dropping large hail and copious rainfall, unleashing flash floods, and leaving behind a dense puddle of cold outflow air that covered thousands of square miles.  Above all that mayhem and[...]
  • Cloud-to-Air Discharge

  • This is a twilight shot of a big, bright, forked, cloud-to-air lightning bolt originating in the vault of a supercell—in this case, an area just NE of the main updraft—an elevated region of rain and large hail occupying the large notch between updraft and downshear anvil.  Intense charge separation happens in this part of su[...]
  • Twilight Tempest

  • An unusual July chase in an unusual spring storm season:  1993.  Characterized mainly by an extensive and seemingly unrelenting series of flooding rainstorms and convective clusters across the Midwest and east-central Plains, including Kansas and Missouri, the storms of July were a last hurrah—a capstone on a year of floodin[...]
  • The Sunrise Tree

  • Yet another glorious winter's dawn breaks over a small pond in eastern Norman, one among countless many such bodies of water that dot our state.  The tall tree at left, rooted in the dam of this pond and next to another, frames this among several images shot here over the past few years, mostly after staying up for the dawn [...]
  • Ohanepecosh River Canyon Flood

  • Fast-moving floodwaters, fed both by the melting of Mt. Rainier's record-heavy snows and ongoing rainfall, made the Ohanapecosh River roar through its canyon with a booming vibration both heard and felt.  Over millions of years, a non-trivial portion of the volcano's southeast flank will be carried away, right down this gorg[...]
  • Day's End in the Wintertime Woods

  • On a calm, mild, late-winter's evening, pastel tones of the sunset sky filtered through the dense canopy of oak and walnut woods and thorny vines characteristic of the Cross Timbers.  Located in the transition from eastern forests to Great Plains, these woods shelter numerous species of birds.  Even with the somewhat reduced[...]