Tags archives: University of Oklahoma

  • Golden Streaks

  • One of the advantages of night shifts in the office park is seeing quiet sunrises from high atop, when time permits a quick break to zip on up.  Fortunately that was the case here, as two rooftop observers were blessed with this sight:  a streaky plume of convective cirrus, producing a small mammatus belt and trailing virga [...]
  • Double Reflected Convective Pastels

  • A weakening supercell moved over cool outflow from earlier storms, combining with some fall foliage at ground level to dazzle who witnessed the spectacle with a brief but brilliant splash of pastel tones.  The dominant light source for the scene came from a strange direction, too:  northeast (left)!  Sunset light first was r[...]
  • Cotton Candy Sky

  • Sometimes a sunset looks so delicious that one wants to reach into the sky, grab it and eat!  Cirrus clouds spread themselves in candy filaments through a deepening twilight blue, cast in that memorable hue for just a fleeting moment, yet long enough to evoke a sudden craving for a childhood carnival treat. Norman OK (9 N[...]
  • Radial Rise

  • This was one of the most visually peculiar and symbolically striking sunrise formations I've ever witnessed, but the physical explanation is easy.  Nearly evenly spaced cirrus bands, aligned south to north across the southern sky, actually were parallel to each other.  As with slats in a set of vertical blinds, but more tran[...]
  • Snow Fog and Pumpjack at Sunrise

  • What can be more "Okie Winter" in theme than oil-drilling machinery rising through the morning fog, above a field of snow?  At ten inches of accumulation, this was the heaviest storm total around Norman since the multiple "footers" of the late 1980s, sampled in some of the other imagery here, and made a remarkable scene bene[...]
  • Arboreal Sunset Again

  • Two days after another splendid, banded arboreal sunset, the sky lit up even sooner and brighter, though as usual, uniquely.  Every sunset scene is different simply by virtue of the fluid nature of cloud forms, regardless of the foreground for the shot or the zoom or pan chosen by the photographer.  Here, in addition to the [...]
  • Arboreal Sunset

  • This scene was shot on the west lawn of the National Weather Center.  Not one normally prone to letting foregrounds take up this much of a sunset composition, I did some experimentation with the vertical branches and horizontal sunset-cirrus bands, deep-zooming into the reddest part of the western sky, and was rather pleased[...]
  • Winter Wonderland, Oklahoma

  • The winter of 1987–1988 was notable in Norman for several heavy snowfalls of around a foot.  Being a man of the lower latitudes, I only remember such otherwise miserable cold-weather events for their occasionally beautiful results, like this shot of the duck pond at Brandt Park.  Who says Oklahoma doesn't have major winter w[...]
  • Ducks and Snow

  • Another peaceful winter scene graces the duck pond on the OU campus.  Between 12 and 14 inches of snow blanketed the shoreline.  Despite the chilled waters, the ducks seemed quite pleased to be there, instead of trudging through that thick blanket of icy white powder ashore. Norman OK (Jan 88) Looking SSE 35.2069, -97.43[...]
  • Ice Damage at the National Weather Center

  • Decorative adornments that curve around the outer roof line of the National Weather Center became coated with ice during a freezing-rain event.  Lubricated by meltwater during ensuing days, the ice slid off and tumbled six stories, busting this safety glass above the first-floor entryway.  Fortunately this windowpane was und[...]
  • Western Banded Brilliance

  • Deep-zooming into a series of thick cirrus bands at sunset yielded a marvelous melange of orange tones, with the nearer sky more muted and bluer in shadows.   Though the field of view was limited, it was far from limiting; in fact, elements of the sky normally overlooked at wide angle or even a "normal" 50-mm focal perspecti[...]
  • Pulse Storm, Blasting Past Pileus

  • Narrow but intense, an updraft chimney of a low-shear, summertime pulse storm shoots skyward through multiple pileus layers and overshooting its own anvil, into the lower stratosphere.  This storm would drift northward along an outflow boundary for another half hour or so before falling apart under the weight of its own cool[...]