Tags archives: moon

  • Moon through Anvil

  • One fine evening in Scotts Bluff National Monument, after presumably its last lightning activity, a weakening supercell floated overhead, its anvil translucent to the waxing moon.  The surrounding landscape of sandstone and ash bluffs took on the blended hue of refracted moonlight from above and town lights of Scottsbluff an[...]
  • Lunar Crepusculars

  • Altocumulus clouds passing in front of the moon split its light into crepuscular rays, visible as well to eye as to camera exposure, thanks to the very rural setting devoid of more than isolated artificial light. 10 S North Platte NE (23 Jun 10) Looking SW 40.9889, -100.764
  • Sunrise Crescent

  • Seldom do I witness sunrises, especially compared to the bulk of the day-shift civilization, because of being a frequent nighttime worker and either being indoors or asleep at the crack o' dawn.  Yet keeping night hours on a day off has its advantages, particularly when staying up to witness a spectacle such as this after an[...]
  • Sunset Light, Montana Moon

  • Storm-observing days don't necessarily end after the storms, or in the day.   We soaked in the sweet-earth aroma of rain-soaked dryland prairie, the last diurnal birds singing their roosting songs, as fresh, cool breezes carried the scent of rejuvenation across the landscape.   Twilight remnants of sunset light cast aglow th[...]
  • Lunar Corona

  • A broken, diffuse altocumulus deck put on a colorful show of nocturnal atmospheric optics during the cool, pre-dawn hours.  Coronas come to the eye by means of optical diffraction (bending of light) through small water droplets of the clouds.  I enjoyed this corona more than most because the cloud layer moving quickly and wa[...]
  • Mooney Sunrise

  • Taking in a glorious sunrise from one side of the sky to the other, I realized that soon a rather unconventional composition soon would avail itself—dawn's half moon bathed in soft, feathery, coral-pink translucence of sunrise cirrus.  Time for the zoom lens, quickly! Norman OK (31 Jan 16) Looking SW
  • Sunrise Swath Overhead

  • The last sunrise of January 2016 was a treat, both from the opposite side of the sky and from this one.  Rotating forward from a set of overnight shifts, I was unusually awake and available to view, appreciate and photograph this masterpiece of the sky's ethereal fluid canvas.  The richly textured belt of cirrus soon transla[...]
  • Twilight

  • Between sunset and nightfall passes the period known as twilight, a period of illumination long subject to rumination by poets and romantics the world over.  Its morning counterpart has the same name. Twilight has varying stages, the first ending with civil dusk (sun 6° under horizon).  Even with the sun well below the horiz[...]
  • Super Blood Harvest Moon Tetrad

  • My admittedly ridiculous title combines the best (or worst!) of many nicknames for the uncommon juxtaposition of a so-called "super moon" (in its closest orbital segment to Earth), "blood moon" (red light refracted through Earth's atmosphere then reflected off the lunar surface), tetrad (fourth straight lunar eclipse that ha[...]
  • Carlsbad Storm and Moon

  • Our rewarding convective day began at lunch and ended after dinnertime, with over eight hours of storm observation (a full day's pleasure) in southeastern New Mexico.  It all culminated magnificently in the appearance of this sunset-hour supercell under the waxing gibbous moon.   The anchoring storm at right had formed south[...]
  • Baily's Beads

  • On the other side of an annular eclipse from the first crescent sun, the visual edges of the lunar and solar discs became juxtaposed, rendering a beaded edge for just a few seconds.  This phenomenon, which also shows up during total solar eclipses, is known as Baily's beads after its 1836 documentation by Francis Baily.  The[...]
  • Lake Superior Moonrise

  • In a tranquil scene defying Lake Superior's harsh reputation, the lake mirrors the rising summer moon.  [The photographer somehow defied hundreds of voracious mosquitoes; but that's another story altogether!]  The band of moonlight bouncing off the water's surface is actually a composite of reflections from thousands of small wa[...]