Tags archives: wall clouds

  • Between a Mesocyclone and a Tornado

  • The rising dust under this ragged but rapidly rotating wall cloud also was moving around in a closed circulation—just not as visually intensely as the clouds above.   If I had to guess, it was near the margins of the lower EF0 wind threshold of 65-mph three-second gusts, but of course this storm did not have a mobile radar o[...]
  • Gustnado near Mesocyclone

  • Gustnadoes are whirlwinds that form in outflow air, disconnected from the cloud base above.  They are not tornadoes, despite sometimes being misidentified by spotters or misclassified as such in official storm reports.  Occasionally the winds in gustnadoes become strong enough for minor damage, and it probably is not a good [...]
  • Loyal Storm

  • High-based, skeletal and sculpted, this southeastward-translating supercell seemed more fitting over the central High Plains than the red-dirt flatlands of central Oklahoma.  It acted like a Colorado storm transplanted 400 miles southeast.  Fortunately, that meant we only had to drive about 90 miles for something so spectacu[...]
  • Knickerbocker Slobberknocker

  • That title was irresistible to click, wasn't it?  Gotcha!  There is a (stretched) reason behind it, though.  This classic supercell started on the dryline west of San Angelo while we were eating lunch there, then turned ESE past Mertzon.  We headed there for a meet-and-greet session with the storm, and after some reorganizat[...]
  • Beware Storms with Mustaches

  • One of the late, great NWS meteorologist Al Moller's favorite admonitions to storm spotters, chasers, students, and others in rapt audiences was:  "Beware storms with mustaches!"  That folksy wisdom, from a keen scientist and father of storm-spotter training, had strong foundations.  Although this storm was not tornadic, som[...]
  • Updraft Base, Amarillo Hailer

  • After producing baseball-sized hail near Four Way, a couple of wall clouds and even funnels, this marvelous, high-based supercell turned almost due southward across the High Plains of the Panhandle, in a defiantly rightward display of deviant motion.   Here it moved directly over the east side of Amarillo, whose downtown can[...]
  • Wellington Wanderer

  • Despite bouts of furious rotation, the mesocyclone of the spectacular Wellington supercell only could condense brief funnels and a couple of small but unmistakable tornadoes during its journey across the eastern Panhandle.  This little but lively tornado, seen here from several miles away with aid of a 400-mm zoom lens, buzz[...]
  • Looky Thar Pardner, A Storm over Yonder!

  • The backdrop of a supercell, with ragged wall cloud and wild, banded cloud formations overhead, offers a unique interpretation of two-dimensional art on the High Plains of eastern New Mexico.  This is one of two cutout-mural cowboys at the hilltop location astride US-285, each signed and designed by artist John Cerney. 9 [...]
  • Old Duke Wall Cloud

  • The young wall cloud quickly aged as precipitation from the rear of the hook began wrapping into the adjoining occlusion-downdraft surge, shooting stable air into a western and southern crescent of this circulation's inflow and eroding the wall cloud. In fact, a more ancient occlusion—manifest as a rain-wrapped wall cloud fa[...]
  • Young Duke Wall Cloud

  • Along a persistent, east-northeast/west-southwest-oriented convergence axis, the youngest occlusion of a cyclic, somewhat wet, classic supercell spun forth a small but vigorous mesocyclone, part of which manifest visually in the form of this wall cloud.   Although it displayed strong convergence and rising motions, only weak[...]
  • Stovepipe Tornado

  • This long-lived (over half an hour) tornado was obviously well-organized and probably quite intense at times, capable of great damage to a populated area. During its early and small stage it injured two kids in an overturned vehicle along I-80 and destroyed some unanchored mobile homes.  Fortunately, the vortex missed nearby[...]
  • Forgan LP

  • Large, high-based, slowly rotating, this wall cloud menacingly loomed at the bottom of an LP (low-precipitation) supercell near the Oklahoma Panhandle burg of Forgan.  Note the pointed mass of scud, connected to the right underside of the wall cloud.  This "scud cone" was wrongly identified as a tornado by chasers who were v[...]