Tags archives: twilight

  • The Green Flash

  • My second attempt at photographing the elusive "green flash" worked, after barely missing one over the Gulf from Florida a couple years before.  This type is known as an inferior-mirage flash, where the sun is below the horizon, but a mirage under a thermal inversion acts as a thin, edge-on prismatic lens to separate the blu[...]
  • Twilight Surf: Olympic National Park

  • This twilight, on the edge of the land of "Twilight", brought solace, and not the least bit of fright.  Smoothed ethereally by short time exposure, the surf of Rialto and a shallow, thin fog layer offered a fluidly undular, matte reflection of the slate-blue sky above, as final reds of dusk painted the horizon.  Meanwhile th[...]
  • Sedona Strike

  • On my first travel day in Arizona, and after an afternoon in Petrified Forest, I wheeled over to Sedona to meet Dave Blanchard for a brief bit of desert-storm photography in the sunset hour.  This was the best of a few lightning discharges we caught from a brief, elevated storm that went up behind a late-afternoon complex, a[...]
  • Lightning-Lit Left-Mover

  • This fascinating, marvelous little anticyclonic supercell sped northeastward into the deepening twilight blue, sparking and hailing, twirling laminar skirts of cloud material in a clockwise dance across the remote Palo Duro Canyon country southwest of Goodnight, TX.  A "good night" it was for those of us fortunate enough to [...]
  • Cloud-to-Air Discharge

  • This is a twilight shot of a big, bright, forked, cloud-to-air lightning bolt originating in the vault of a supercell—in this case, an area just NE of the main updraft—an elevated region of rain and large hail occupying the large notch between updraft and downshear anvil.  Intense charge separation happens in this part of su[...]
  • Twilight Tempest

  • An unusual July chase in an unusual spring storm season:  1993.  Characterized mainly by an extensive and seemingly unrelenting series of flooding rainstorms and convective clusters across the Midwest and east-central Plains, including Kansas and Missouri, the storms of July were a last hurrah—a capstone on a year of floodin[...]
  • Sunrise High Rise

  • Despite not being morning people, motivation wasn't hard to force ourselves out of bed, out of the motel, and out to the photography spot for moments like this on a few consecutive dawns.  We shifted uphill from a previous day's shooting spot to view this:  the first breaking of the sun's glow across the top of tallest and m[...]
  • Crepuscular and Curvy Contrail

  • Less than 40 feet but more than 13 years from where I shot my archetypical image of crepuscular rays, a late-summer sunset beamed past clouds unseen in the northwest that cut its fading plane of light into rays.  A separate contrail no longer caught the pink light, the western of its two segments standing out well against th[...]
  • Aerial Twilight

  • Compared to the previous twilight photo, shot from sea level, the upper sky here is darker, the dynamic range greater over the same arc-distance of the image.  This is because I shot the photo from an aircraft at around 35,000 feet above sea level, which is in the upper troposphere in wintertime, and well-removed from the gr[...]
  • Multicells Aglow

  • Back in my last season of slide film, a series of multicell thunderstorms formed above outflow from a large MCS earlier in the afternoon.  This gave us a long lasting show of internally generated light to cap off a very peaceful and pleasant evening of storm observing that featured a display of reflected sunset glow from a s[...]
  • Miami's Twilight Reflections

  • Gentle ripples on the surface of Biscayne Bay broke the reflected evening skyline of Brickell Avenue into ever-changing bands and shifting columns, never offering precisely the same scene from any given fraction of a second to the next. Miami FL (28 Nov 11) Looking N 25.7464, -80.1933
  • Supercellular Sparkle

  • Despite gradually weakening since its near-sunset peak, the Arcadia supercell continued blasting forth lightning from every level.  When we finally were able to get enough distance between us and the storm to feel reasonably safe outdoors, the pace of the best lightning had lessened considerably.  Still, this storm offered a[...]