Tags archives: Oklahoma

  • Wheat and What Destroys It

  • Every year, hail and thunderstorm winds do millions of dollars in damage to crops across the nation's breadbasket—much of it wheat, and much of it in supercells.  Fortunately for the owners of this field, the dark, messy, heavy-precipitation (HP) supercell shown here slid just a few miles to the west and north, sparing this [...]
  • Downward-Pointing Crepusculars

  • We often see crepuscular rays with an apparent upward aim.  In this case, the chunky young anvil from a nascent supercell spread across that part of the sky containing the sun, part of which can be seen through a hole in the cloud.  As with other crepusculars, the rays actually are parallel, but seem to spread away from each[...]
  • Golden Streaks

  • One of the advantages of night shifts in the office park is seeing quiet sunrises from high atop, when time permits a quick break to zip on up.  Fortunately that was the case here, as two rooftop observers were blessed with this sight:  a streaky plume of convective cirrus, producing a small mammatus belt and trailing virga [...]
  • Between a Mesocyclone and a Tornado

  • The rising dust under this ragged but rapidly rotating wall cloud also was moving around in a closed circulation—just not as visually intensely as the clouds above.   If I had to guess, it was near the margins of the lower EF0 wind threshold of 65-mph three-second gusts, but of course this storm did not have a mobile radar o[...]
  • More Truck-Stop Thunder

  • A needed respite from the road turned into a marvelous electrical show in the sky outside a northern Oklahoma truck stop.  Several magnificent discharges split the rainy sky before the responsible elevated storm raced off to the east-northeast and weakened.  Looking at this alone, one wouldn't guess that feet behind me sat a[...]
  • Double Reflected Convective Pastels

  • A weakening supercell moved over cool outflow from earlier storms, combining with some fall foliage at ground level to dazzle who witnessed the spectacle with a brief but brilliant splash of pastel tones.  The dominant light source for the scene came from a strange direction, too:  northeast (left)!  Sunset light first was r[...]
  • Sunrise Tree: Fall 2017

  • The autumnal southward retreat of the rising sun signals yet another cool season for sunrise opportunities on one of my favorite viewing vantages, with the "Sunrise Tree" framing the left side of the shot.  Here, bases of a honeycomb of interconnected altocumuli snatch the rays and reflect a golden-orange wonder, a texturing[...]
  • Tornado without Funnel

  • The supercell already had offered a pleasant dose of high-based scenery two hours before, and a gustnado near a previous mesocyclonic occlusion in the intervening hour.  Although the southeastward-moving storm remained high-based as it approached the Richland/Piedmont area, we surmised that it might have one brief shot at a [...]
  • Gustnado near Mesocyclone

  • Gustnadoes are whirlwinds that form in outflow air, disconnected from the cloud base above.  They are not tornadoes, despite sometimes being misidentified by spotters or misclassified as such in official storm reports.  Occasionally the winds in gustnadoes become strong enough for minor damage, and it probably is not a good [...]
  • Loyal Storm

  • High-based, skeletal and sculpted, this southeastward-translating supercell seemed more fitting over the central High Plains than the red-dirt flatlands of central Oklahoma.  It acted like a Colorado storm transplanted 400 miles southeast.  Fortunately, that meant we only had to drive about 90 miles for something so spectacu[...]
  • Horseshoe Vortex on Supercell Inflow Band

  • We were admiring a fine-enough supercell in the western sky when—lo and behold!—I spied out of the left peripheral vision a sight not seen before.  Riding along the top of the westward-feeding low-level inflow band was a horseshoe vortex (far middle left), a slowly rotating cloud tube formed from shear-induced stretching of [...]
  • Keystone Shelf

  • It was no time for casual crappie jiggin' in the flooded trees.  Formerly a supercell, this storm was overtaken by the southern end of a strengthening squall line as its outflow and shelf cloud surged toward the western reaches of an overfilled, muddy Keystone Lake.  The spring-green forest, flooded by water laden with red-b[...]