Tags archives: Nebraska

  • Spotlit LP on the Great Plains

  • While observing a closer, more precip-dense supercell from its inflow region, another storm of low-precipitation character floated past in the opposite direction that was marvelous in its own way.  Double the fun!  This storm plied the southwesterlies just outside the shadow of its larger neighbor for about half an hour afte[...]
  • Hail Flood

  • Upper Dugout Creek gathered a large mass of both rain hail that fell from a memorable supercell and washed down assorted local drainages.  Since hail is ice, it floats, and was carried downstream by the overflowing creek, intermingling with assorted plant material and other detritus along the way.  The resulting mixed-compos[...]
  • Electric Loop

  • During the trip to see the total solar eclipse, and on the day we left Oklahoma, I closed out a fine travel day by intercepting an elevated, nighttime storm over the Platte River.   It prolifically flung cloud-to-cloud and cloud-to-air lightning, including countless loops from cloud to air to cloud, of various sizes and shap[...]
  • Circumhorizon Arc

  • We had arrived in the general target area of marginal afternoon storm potential, and decided to explore parts of the ironically named and almost wholly anthropogenic Nebraska National Forest.  Right after leaving, while cruising toward Thedford and a future day's rendezvous with supercells, an odd color effect that I couldn'[...]
  • Moon through Anvil

  • One fine evening in Scotts Bluff National Monument, after presumably its last lightning activity, a weakening supercell floated overhead, its anvil translucent to the waxing moon.  The surrounding landscape of sandstone and ash bluffs took on the blended hue of refracted moonlight from above and town lights of Scottsbluff an[...]
  • Night Storm over the Platte River

  • Nebraska treated me well weatherwise and otherwise in 2017, despite missing out on springtime storm-intercept opportunities there.  A March trip to see the sandhill crane migration dazzled us with the experience of seeing a huge flock of them flying through a rainbow (along with snow geese, too!).  Just a couple hours before[...]
  • Summertime Supercellular Sunset

  • On our way northwest to set up for eclipse viewing two days later, we noted a massive, heavy-precipitation supercell on radar erupting out of a pre-existing, small area of thunderstorms to the distant north, in north-central Nebraska.  Too late in the day to drive closer than about 80 miles to the storm before darkness set i[...]
  • After the Corner Flow

  • In meteorology, "corner flow" usually refers to the area of upturning of inward-spiraling flow in an intense vortex (such as a tornado).  Here I make a bad pun of it, since this actually was the result of nontornadic, downburst flow at a (street) corner!   The lush thickness of green grass belies the very severe winds that b[...]
  • Nebraska Prairie Whirl

  • Conditionally dangerous yet ultimately harmless, the visible part of this vortex eased across the sinewy roll of the central Nebraska landscape for nearly 15 minutes, metamorphosing from tentative funnel to elephant-trunk form, this, then a vaporous mimic of dental floss.  The tornado behaved itself, avoided substantial stru[...]
  • "Breaking Wave" Supercell

  • Among the most spectacular supercells I've ever seen, this dazzling storm cruised eastward across the nocturnal Nebraska sky, bathing itself in almost continuous light from its own furious generation engine for intracloud lightning.  The storm itself took on the shape of an enormous breaking wave, while shear-induced, parall[...]
  • Cranebow

  • Here is but a small glimpse of that sublime moment when, after three days of cold, windy overcast, the line of showers passes east, sunshine breaks out to illuminate the late-afternoon "magic hour", the "American Serengeti" brilliantly erupts with life:   hundreds upon hundreds of sandhill cranes take off into a rainbow-fest[...]
  • Snow Geese in the Rain

  • During the "magic hour" of late-afternoon light, a small flock of snow geese and countless raindrops, near and far, imparted an oil-painting-like texture to the wondrous scene along the back side of a band of rain.  These and another half million of their closest friends and relatives (geese and cranes) converge annually upo[...]