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  • Arboreal Sunset Again

  • Two days after another splendid, banded arboreal sunset, the sky lit up even sooner and brighter, though as usual, uniquely.  Every sunset scene is different simply by virtue of the fluid nature of cloud forms, regardless of the foreground for the shot or the zoom or pan chosen by the photographer.  Here, in addition to the [...]
  • Arboreal Sunset

  • This scene was shot on the west lawn of the National Weather Center.  Not one normally prone to letting foregrounds take up this much of a sunset composition, I did some experimentation with the vertical branches and horizontal sunset-cirrus bands, deep-zooming into the reddest part of the western sky, and was rather pleased[...]
  • Oklahoma Panhandle Did It Today!

  • For hours, this dryline-born storm puttered erratically north-northeastward across the Texas and Oklahoma Panhandles as a high-based multicell and weak supercell, seemingly allergic to the concept of robust organization.  We got disgusted by its poor structure and seeming impotence in spite of favorable deep shear, and left [...]
  • Orange Sky

  • Blazing across the twilight sky above Kansas City's city hall, a supercell-spawned show of flaming-orange mammatus signals the end of a stormy day.  The stormy evening, however, was just beginning, as the supercell became elevated with a marvelous lightning show across areas north of the Missouri River. Kansas City MO (25[...]
  • Mosquero Gust Front

  • Quaint and quirky, the friendly old High Plains burg of Mosquero, NM, temporarily hosted a supercell on this tumultuous late-spring afternoon, a storm that had sported a classical wall cloud and mesocyclone region shortly before the outflow-dominant phase seen here entering town.  A profuse, vegetation-shredding hail dump so[...]
  • Altus Crawlers

  • Darkness ruled the night.  Then, for just a second or two, from one node of intense charge separation high in the sky, and hidden behind an intervening chunk of midlevel clouds, filaments of electricity erupted in several directions at once, crawling at lightning speed along the underside of the storm's anvil.  Back into the[...]
  • Winter Wonderland, Oklahoma

  • The winter of 1987–1988 was notable in Norman for several heavy snowfalls of around a foot.  Being a man of the lower latitudes, I only remember such otherwise miserable cold-weather events for their occasionally beautiful results, like this shot of the duck pond at Brandt Park.  Who says Oklahoma doesn't have major winter w[...]
  • Nebraska Arcus: West

  • Some arcus or shelf clouds have laminar, smooth banding that occurs when the cold pool forces upward a layer of relatively stable air at that level.  Others, such as this one, are more convective, or bubbly and rolling in character, the lifted air being unstable.  [Here is a view of the east side of the same formation.]  Sci[...]
  • Nebraska Arcus: East

  • An earlier, fast-moving supercell sent out an intense, multi-county-scale gust front, reinforced by assorted mainly elevated storms that formed in the warm-advection area atop the cold pool.   While that ended the chase day early, it graced us with the opportunity for some good times with friends out on the Great Plains whil[...]
  • Ducks and Snow

  • Another peaceful winter scene graces the duck pond on the OU campus.  Between 12 and 14 inches of snow blanketed the shoreline.  Despite the chilled waters, the ducks seemed quite pleased to be there, instead of trudging through that thick blanket of icy white powder ashore. Norman OK (Jan 88) Looking SSE 35.2069, -97.43[...]
  • Pray for Rain

  • A common and oft-justified sentiment in southwestern Oklahoma, this sign manifest authentic desperation following the drought of 2012, which lasted through wintertime and into spring 2013 here.   Alas, this high-based storm's heavy-precip core would miss this spot and the city of Altus, just to the south, leaving a narrow sw[...]
  • Barely Tornadic Bowl

  • After its impressive debut (especially for a high-based storm that hadn't threatened to produce for a long time beforehand), this surprise tornado continued to churn along at slow forward speeds across the high tablelands of northeastern New Mexico, for more than 10 minutes.  Very faint, occasional wisps of rotating dust occ[...]