Blog page

  • Lake Perryton

  • No, this isn't one of those classical arcus-cloud scenes from somewhere around the Rio de la Plata in South America. Instead, it's the high, normally dry Texas Panhandle!  As if a previous day of excessive rains in an already-wet spring weren't enough, yet another thunderstorm loomed with its shelf cloud, ready to drench thi[...]
  • Snow Geese in the Rain

  • During the "magic hour" of late-afternoon light, a small flock of snow geese and countless raindrops, near and far, imparted an oil-painting-like texture to the wondrous scene along the back side of a band of rain.  These and another half million of their closest friends and relatives (geese and cranes) converge annually upo[...]
  • Blizzard at My Back

  • Yes, I was out in a full-fledged blizzard with gusts to 60 mph, barely able to stand, bracing with back into wind, shooting away.  It wasn't balmy outside.  Fortunately, I was dressed in more layers than a Vidalia onion, looking much like the Michelin Man, and didn't have to go too far to get into warm shelter. Freezing in r[...]
  • Congestus at Sunset

  • About an hour and a half before this scene, a heavy-precipitation (HP) supercell passed over the semiarid southwest Texas scrubland below, dropping large hail and copious rainfall, unleashing flash floods, and leaving behind a dense puddle of cold outflow air that covered thousands of square miles.  Above all that mayhem and[...]
  • Cloud-to-Air Discharge

  • This is a twilight shot of a big, bright, forked, cloud-to-air lightning bolt originating in the vault of a supercell—in this case, an area just NE of the main updraft—an elevated region of rain and large hail occupying the large notch between updraft and downshear anvil.  Intense charge separation happens in this part of su[...]
  • Twilight Tempest

  • An unusual July chase in an unusual spring storm season:  1993.  Characterized mainly by an extensive and seemingly unrelenting series of flooding rainstorms and convective clusters across the Midwest and east-central Plains, including Kansas and Missouri, the storms of July were a last hurrah—a capstone on a year of floodin[...]
  • The Sunrise Tree

  • Yet another glorious winter's dawn breaks over a small pond in eastern Norman, one among countless many such bodies of water that dot our state.  The tall tree at left, rooted in the dam of this pond and next to another, frames this among several images shot here over the past few years, mostly after staying up for the dawn [...]
  • Ohanepecosh River Canyon Flood

  • Fast-moving floodwaters, fed both by the melting of Mt. Rainier's record-heavy snows and ongoing rainfall, made the Ohanapecosh River roar through its canyon with a booming vibration both heard and felt.  Over millions of years, a non-trivial portion of the volcano's southeast flank will be carried away, right down this gorg[...]
  • Day's End in the Wintertime Woods

  • On a calm, mild, late-winter's evening, pastel tones of the sunset sky filtered through the dense canopy of oak and walnut woods and thorny vines characteristic of the Cross Timbers.  Located in the transition from eastern forests to Great Plains, these woods shelter numerous species of birds.  Even with the somewhat reduced[...]
  • Arboreal Sunset Again

  • Two days after another splendid, banded arboreal sunset, the sky lit up even sooner and brighter, though as usual, uniquely.  Every sunset scene is different simply by virtue of the fluid nature of cloud forms, regardless of the foreground for the shot or the zoom or pan chosen by the photographer.  Here, in addition to the [...]
  • Arboreal Sunset

  • This scene was shot on the west lawn of the National Weather Center.  Not one normally prone to letting foregrounds take up this much of a sunset composition, I did some experimentation with the vertical branches and horizontal sunset-cirrus bands, deep-zooming into the reddest part of the western sky, and was rather pleased[...]
  • Oklahoma Panhandle Did It Today!

  • For hours, this dryline-born storm puttered erratically north-northeastward across the Texas and Oklahoma Panhandles as a high-based multicell and weak supercell, seemingly allergic to the concept of robust organization.  We got disgusted by its poor structure and seeming impotence in spite of favorable deep shear, and left [...]