Author archives: Roger Edwards

Lines of Inundation
  • Lines of Inundation

  • Somehow, two things conceptually as ugly as a muddy water and a chain-link fence can combine to form an abstractly interesting, uncommonly depicted, and perhaps even beautiful pattern.  I suppose, in a photographic sense, this is the equivalent of a Reuben sandwich for me:  corned beef, kraut and dressing that I wouldn't con[...]
  • Salt Particle Reflections

  • On a midsummer's high noon, almost precisely 24 hours before the landfall of Hurricane Dennis at this very spot, the calm water belied the tumult that soon would unfold.  Hints luked.  Beaches were strangely devoid of the usual collection of fishermen, old couples strolling the strandline, kids with sand buckets, alluring yo[...]
  • Outflow Eruption

  • Following the passage of a strong gust front, the turbulent textures of a "whale's mouth" formation offer the moving illusion of a rolling boil, a perspective made even more striking when the formation brackets a volcanic mountain in the High Plains of northeastern New Mexico,  giving the eruptive appearance a geological fou[...]
  • Sedona Strike

  • On my first travel day in Arizona, and after an afternoon in Petrified Forest, I wheeled over to Sedona to meet Dave Blanchard for a brief bit of desert-storm photography in the sunset hour.  This was the best of a few lightning discharges we caught from a brief, elevated storm that went up behind a late-afternoon complex, a[...]
  • Sabinoso Supercell

  • Intercepting a supercell in mid-August in New Mexico—why not?  While wrapping up a southwestern storm, photo and hiking trip, I noticed that a narrow, mesoscale belt of enhanced mid/upper-level northwesterly winds, southwest of a shortwave trough over the central Plains, would pass across this part of the state during the af[...]
  • Don't Fence Me In!

  • This northwest-flow supercell formed just a few miles to my west in the Sangre de Cristo foothills, while I was pumping gas in Springer.  This made the target storm self-evident.  After peeling of the mountains, it churned along a 5-hour southeastward odyssey toward Tucumcari, offering occasionally marvelous looks not normal[...]
  • Sparks over New Mexico Ranch

  • Where the High Plains meet the extinct volcanoes of northeastern New Mexico, an electrified sky crackled its warning of impending danger to outdoor safety, while also offering a welcomed message: notice of soaking rain for a thirsty landscape.  The wind-beaten old cottonwood tree likely owes its lifespan to overflow and leak[...]
  • Nevada Forks

  • An evening desert storm, riding the last ribbons of a shrinking band of monsoonal easterlies, flings forked jabs of deadly electricity over the skies of extreme southeastern Nevada.  I had been hoping for more action in central and southern Arizona—the prototypical monsoon-storm hotbed.  Instead, an expanding swath of low/mi[...]
  • Desert Reflectives

  • On this two-week trip I went on several exhaustingly high and/or long hikes far from roads, yet one of my favorite scenes arose utterly unplanned and unanticipated, within a stone's throw of a highway, and a short stroll down a dirt path.  The lesson:  be open to wonderment and marvelous experiences, regardless of "ease" of [...]
  • Total Solar Eclipse 2017

  • At age six, looking at a map of future solar totalities in the World Book Encyclopedia, I had the High Plains part of the path in the crosshairs.  Elke and I each have been waiting our whole lives for this, decades since childhood, so it's fitting that we did it together.  After a lifetime, we finally witnessed one of the mo[...]
  • Eyjafjallajökull: Landscape, Waterscape, Icescape

  • Eyjafjallajökull—nearly unpronounceable but palpably dangerous—offered stark and wondrous beauty just four years after its infamous eruption, peacefully capped in glaciers and draining waterfalls across its rolling green skirt, as if no such geologic tantrum had been thrown.  Still, one can see evidence of the pyroclastic pa[...]
  • Big Spray

  • Scampering up a steep, slick trail, then over to a notch in the high cliffs, yielded a view of the beautiful, majestic Skógafoss that seldom appears in tourist shots:  framed by plants and moss-covered crags.  One of Iceland's largest waterfalls at roughly 200 (tall) by 50 feet (wide), this pounding pile of water is notoriou[...]