Author archives: Roger Edwards

  • Icelandic Waterfall, by the Drop

  • On a fine morning at Öxarárfoss (Thingvellir National Park), it was tempting and justifiable to do some full-scale waterfall photography.   Still, when one can freeze-frame thousands of drops to compose a more intimate and uncommon perspective on a world-famous cascade, why not? 16 ENE Mosfellsdalur, Iceland (11 Aug 14) L[...]
  • Hofsvik Sunset Prelude

  • As seen from Iceland's narrow western coastal plain, the interior bluffs and hills grasped the very last of their day's rays, while deepening golden yellows illuminated orographic low clouds hovering overhead.  Despite its shallowness, this cumuliform cloud feature produced warm-cloud rain, as evident in the short rainbow se[...]
  • 1908 Reykjanes Lighthouse in Fog

  • Lighthouses don't help much when the fog is this dense, and they're usually not flipped on in the daytime anyway.  Aside from the ambient cool, high-humidity, maritime air typically attendant to this corner of the North Atlantic, advection from a nearby geothermal steam area helped greatly to construct the fog, and lent a so[...]
  • Brycebow

  • Retreating storms cast both a rainbow and darkly textured background past the warmly lit orange stone walls and pillars of Bryce Canyon.  The same storms had passed over the park midday to mid-afternoon, running a lot of people back into cover and thinning the crowds considerably for the onset of late-afternoon "magic hour" [...]
  • Thundering Gallup

  • One electrically bereft storm passed east-northeastward across the desert landscape north of Gallup, offering a tasty-looking pastel sunset.  The next storm in the line produced a lot of lightning, mostly buried deeply in heavy rain, as with the faint strokes in the middle background.  How glorious it was, then, to catch two[...]
  • Sunrise Tree: Fall 2017

  • The autumnal southward retreat of the rising sun signals yet another cool season for sunrise opportunities on one of my favorite viewing vantages, with the "Sunrise Tree" framing the left side of the shot.  Here, bases of a honeycomb of interconnected altocumuli snatch the rays and reflect a golden-orange wonder, a texturing[...]
  • Tornado without Funnel

  • The supercell already had offered a pleasant dose of high-based scenery two hours before, and a gustnado near a previous mesocyclonic occlusion in the intervening hour.  Although the southeastward-moving storm remained high-based as it approached the Richland/Piedmont area, we surmised that it might have one brief shot at a [...]
  • Gustnado near Mesocyclone

  • Gustnadoes are whirlwinds that form in outflow air, disconnected from the cloud base above.  They are not tornadoes, despite sometimes being misidentified by spotters or misclassified as such in official storm reports.  Occasionally the winds in gustnadoes become strong enough for minor damage, and it probably is not a good [...]
  • Loyal Storm

  • High-based, skeletal and sculpted, this southeastward-translating supercell seemed more fitting over the central High Plains than the red-dirt flatlands of central Oklahoma.  It acted like a Colorado storm transplanted 400 miles southeast.  Fortunately, that meant we only had to drive about 90 miles for something so spectacu[...]
  • Knickerbocker Slobberknocker

  • That title was irresistible to click, wasn't it?  Gotcha!  There is a (stretched) reason behind it, though.  This classic supercell started on the dryline west of San Angelo while we were eating lunch there, then turned ESE past Mertzon.  We headed there for a meet-and-greet session with the storm, and after some reorganizat[...]
  • North Iceland Lenticular Stack

  • From amidst a melange of multilayered clouds, a fine little stack of altocumulus lenticularis peeked to reveal a standing wave.  Although altitudes aren't too high in Iceland—mostly under 5,000 feet except for the very highest peaks—the high latitude ensures strong middle-level winds for much of the year that are suitable fo[...]
  • Slot Canyon in the Tent Rocks

  • Water erosion in flash floods, with relatively minor contributions from wind (eolian) processes, erodes slot canyons.  In this case, the process is speedy by geologic standards, thanks to the young, soft, sandy, pyroclastic deposits here, emanating from eruptions around six million years ago in the nearby Jemez volcanic comp[...]