Author archives: Roger Edwards

  • Scaling Hydrology

  • Purposefully composed for ambiguity of scale, this image of fluid natural artwork initially makes one unsure if the height of the photographer is closer to 3, 300, 3,000, or 30,000 feet. Stream flow courses and erodes in similar ways at vastly different scales—in this case, the best answer being 3 feet.  The best give-away i[...]
  • Crystal Daggers

  • After and despite all the destruction an ice storm can bring, the first clear, cold day that follows can offer opportunities to appreciate the peculiar spectacles in the frozen scenes.   As a gentle breeze swayed limbs in the background, making them sparkle and crackle in rhythmic pulsations of color and noise amplified by t[...]
  • Downstream Maelstrom

  • Just downstream from Dettifoss (Europe's largest waterfall) and under the plume of spray, a fluidly abstract scene roiled and roared along in the form of the  snowmelt-swollen Jokulsa a Fjollum River.  The high water, flood-producing in a few places upstream and downstream, ran a deep, muddy gray, laden with volcanic silt an[...]
  • Night Storm over the Platte River

  • Nebraska treated me well weatherwise and otherwise in 2017, despite missing out on springtime storm-intercept opportunities there.  A March trip to see the sandhill crane migration dazzled us with the experience of seeing a huge flock of them flying through a rainbow (along with snow geese, too!).  Just a couple hours before[...]
  • Summertime Supercellular Sunset

  • On our way northwest to set up for eclipse viewing two days later, we noted a massive, heavy-precipitation supercell on radar erupting out of a pre-existing, small area of thunderstorms to the distant north, in north-central Nebraska.  Too late in the day to drive closer than about 80 miles to the storm before darkness set i[...]
Lines of Inundation
  • Lines of Inundation

  • Somehow, two things conceptually as ugly as a muddy water and a chain-link fence can combine to form an abstractly interesting, uncommonly depicted, and perhaps even beautiful pattern.  I suppose, in a photographic sense, this is the equivalent of a Reuben sandwich for me:  corned beef, kraut and dressing that I wouldn't con[...]
  • Salt Particle Reflections

  • On a midsummer's high noon, almost precisely 24 hours before the landfall of Hurricane Dennis at this very spot, the calm water belied the tumult that soon would unfold.  Hints luked.  Beaches were strangely devoid of the usual collection of fishermen, old couples strolling the strandline, kids with sand buckets, alluring yo[...]
  • Outflow Eruption

  • Following the passage of a strong gust front, the turbulent textures of a "whale's mouth" formation offer the moving illusion of a rolling boil, a perspective made even more striking when the formation brackets a volcanic mountain in the High Plains of northeastern New Mexico,  giving the eruptive appearance a geological fou[...]
  • Sedona Strike

  • On my first travel day in Arizona, and after an afternoon in Petrified Forest, I wheeled over to Sedona to meet Dave Blanchard for a brief bit of desert-storm photography in the sunset hour.  This was the best of a few lightning discharges we caught from a brief, elevated storm that went up behind a late-afternoon complex, a[...]
  • Sabinoso Supercell

  • Intercepting a supercell in mid-August in New Mexico—why not?  While wrapping up a southwestern storm, photo and hiking trip, I noticed that a narrow, mesoscale belt of enhanced mid/upper-level northwesterly winds, southwest of a shortwave trough over the central Plains, would pass across this part of the state during the af[...]
  • Don't Fence Me In!

  • This northwest-flow supercell formed just a few miles to my west in the Sangre de Cristo foothills, while I was pumping gas in Springer.  This made the target storm self-evident.  After peeling of the mountains, it churned along a 5-hour southeastward odyssey toward Tucumcari, offering occasionally marvelous looks not normal[...]
  • Sparks over New Mexico Ranch

  • Where the High Plains meet the extinct volcanoes of northeastern New Mexico, an electrified sky crackled its warning of impending danger to outdoor safety, while also offering a welcomed message: notice of soaking rain for a thirsty landscape.  The wind-beaten old cottonwood tree likely owes its lifespan to overflow and leak[...]